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Help

If something doesn't make sense to you and isn't explained here please mail the maintainer for an explanation.

Help viewing PDF files

Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) is well-suited to offering printable files for download.

There are free-of-charge PDF viewers for practically every platform:

MacOS X Preview
For OS X users, we recommend the Preview application that comes with OS X.
Adobe Acrobat Reader
A free-of-charge viewer, available for a wide variety of different computers including Windows, Macintosh, Linux, PalmOS and Pocket PC
xpdf
A free viewer for the X Window System on UNIX and similar platforms. There are also ports to other platforms such as RISC OS, BeOS and for Psion organisers.
Ghostscript
See below for more, but modern versions of ghostscript handle PDF files as well as postscript.
Other
If none of these fit the bill, then search on Google for 'pdf viewer'

Help viewing Postscript files

Ghostscript is the most common postscript interpreter, and available for a wide range of platforms. It has a somewhat complex history. For a graphical interface to Ghostscript you probably want gv (which is a derivative of Ghostview) or GSView (which isn't).

Some of the postscript files here are GZipped, which is a way of compressing them so you can download them quicker. Most postscript viewers will handle GZipped files quite happily, but you may need to save them to disk if your browser is confused.

Try Google for other postscript viewers.

Printing pages from this site

There is no need for a separate 'printable version' of any of the Web pages on this site, we simply use the appropriate Web standards to suggest how to make the printed version look good.

If you have trouble printing - or if your browser still prints the search box and other navigation widgets - please consider using a browser that supports Web standards properly.

For printing PDF and postscript files, please see the advice above about viewers, all of which should allow you to print simply.

What are syndication feeds?

Syndication feeds let you follow the changes on a Web site, without having to keep coming back just to see if anything has changed. They let you use the content published as a feed in a way that is convenient to you, automatically.

Crucially, publishing feeds has become very popular; lots of sites let you look at their content this way, and so there are plenty of readers for any platform.

There are several different formats for syndication - we use RSS 2.0 - but as a user you need not worry too much, practically all the feed readers support RSS 2.0. Play with an RSS reader, to get a feel for what you get.

Syndication geeks might want to look at the specification for RSS 2.0, which is an extension of the 0.91+ formats, or the one for RSS 1.0 which is a speciation of RDF and hangs around with the Semantic Web crowd. More recently, Atom has been developed to clean up some of the grungy inconsistencies between the many forms of RSS.

Our feeds, in RSS 2.0.

Administering this site

To reach the admin pages from the public site, look for the 'Admin' link in the bottom right-hand corner. These will take you to the admin page for what you are looking at. To see the links from outside the department, please visit this page and accept the cookie. Or you can get there by putting /admin in the URL just after 'pubs.doc.ic.ac.uk' on any public page.

All the admin pages are served using HTTPS, and you should use your ordinary DoC login to log in.

 

pubs.doc.ic.ac.uk: built & maintained by Ashok Argent-Katwala.